Home of Howard Alexander Foushee (1870-1916) and Ann Leak Wall "Annie" Foushee (1879 - 1953)

Howard was a lawyer, a state representative and senator, and a superior court judge, as well as a director of the Durham Traction Company (streetcars) and he secured the 1899 charter of the Southern Conservatory of Music. His untimely death in 1916 was caused by pernicious anemia, for which there was no cure at the time. His widow Annie continued to be active with Trinity Methodist Church and the Tourist Club. In 1913, The Foushees built this house seat 810 Proctor Street in the Morehead Hill section of Durham. It was designed by Samuel Linton Leary, the Philadelphia architect who moved to Durham in the early 1890s to design one of the three original buildings on the campus of Trinity College. The Foushees lot, bounded by Vickers Avenue to the east, Proctor Street to the north, Shepherd Street to the west, and Cobb Street to the south, was called "The Terraces" after its landscaped yard. By 1970s this house was used by Allied Arts, which became the Durham Arts Council; and 100 years after its construction it was still in use as the home of Camelot Academy., Item description, identifier (if applicable), Box and Folder information. Durham historical photograph collection (NCC.0055). North Carolina Collection, Durham County Library, NC.
Abstract/Description: Howard was a lawyer, a state representative and senator, and a superior court judge, as well as a director of the Durham Traction Company (streetcars) and he secured the 1899 charter of the Southern Conservatory of Music. His untimely death in 1916 was caused by pernicious anemia, for which there was no cure at the time. His widow Annie continued to be active with Trinity Methodist Church and the Tourist Club. In 1913, The Foushees built this house seat 810 Proctor Street in the Morehead Hill section of Durham. It was designed by Samuel Linton Leary, the Philadelphia architect who moved to Durham in the early 1890s to design one of the three original buildings on the campus of Trinity College. The Foushees lot, bounded by Vickers Avenue to the east, Proctor Street to the north, Shepherd Street to the west, and Cobb Street to the south, was called "The Terraces" after its landscaped yard. By 1970s this house was used by Allied Arts, which became the Durham Arts Council; and 100 years after its construction it was still in use as the home of Camelot Academy.
Subject(s): Durham County (N.C.)
Date Created: 1920s
192X